Restoring Audley End House and Gardens

Audley End House and Gardens has witnessed much during its 400-year history. Each of its owners has made significant changes to the building and landscape, including downsizing when times got hard. But one thing is clear, with £1 million investment project underway, it continues to be cherished.

Conservation worker restores masonry

Accustomed to change

Audley End House was built between 1605 and 1614 by the first Earl of Suffolk. It is considered to be one of the finest Jacobean prodigy houses in England. It was bought by Charles II and used as a Royal Palace until 1701, although by that time it was reported to be in poor condition and considered horribly old fashioned.

The house was remodelled during the 18th century, chiefly for Lady Portsmouth and her heir Sir John Griffin. And finally in the late 1820s, it took on its antiquarian style for the third Lord Braybrooke and his wife Jane Cornwallis.

More than £1 million in repairs

Conservation work scheduled for 2015 and 2016 is a continuation of repairs that began in 2013.

Repairs have been running alongside another major investment programme to re-present the nursery suite and coal gallery for visitors, which was completed in April 2014.

The first phase completed reroofing to the south wing, repairs and decorations to the windows to the front west facing elevation, and masonry repairs, also to the front elevation.

This second phase will complete work to the exterior and includes:

  • roofing repairs to the north wing.
  • window repairs and decorations to the north wing, east facing elevation and south wing.
  • masonry repairs to the north wing, east facing elevation and south wing.
  • key conservation repairs to historic fabric internally such as the cracking to the withdrawing room on the first floor, the state room and water damage to South Library and Adam Library.

Donate Now

This project is an excellent example of how English Heritage works to protect and improve some of England's most important heritage sites. As a registered charity your donations are vital in helping us to bring the story of England to life for more than ten million people who visit our sites each year.

You can make a donation today.

Learn more about other current conservation projects, including Hadrian's Wall and Wrest Park.

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