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Boscobel House and The Royal Oak

Boscobel House Boscobel House Boscobel House Boscobel House
 
 

Boscobel House is currently undergoing essential conservation work and some of the façade is under scaffolding. There is also limited access to some rooms. We apologise for any inconvenience caused.

Built in about 1632, Boscobel House, originally a timber-framed farmhouse, was converted into a hunting lodge by John Giffard of Whiteladies. The Giffard family were Roman Catholics, at a time when the religion suffered persecution, and tradition holds that the true purpose of Boscobel was to serve as a secret place for the shelter of Catholics in times of need.

Following the execution of King Charles I in 1649, his eldest son made a brave though misguided attempt to regain the throne. In 1651 his hopes were crushed at Worcester in the final conflict of the Civil War. Young Charles was forced to flee for his life.

Initially the future King Charles II set out to cross the River Severn into Wales, but found his way blocked by Cromwell's patrols. He sought refuge instead at Boscobel, hiding first in a tree which is now known as The Royal Oak and then spending the night in a priest-hole in the house's attic. He travelled on in disguise via other safe houses before escaping to France.

Boscobel remained a working farm and visitors today can also see the dairy, farmyard, smithy, gardens, and a descendant of The Royal Oak. White Ladies Priory, another of Charles's hiding places, is a short walk away.

Don't Miss

  • Discovering the future King Charles II's hiding places, including 'The Royal Oak' tree and secret priest hole
  • Spectacular views over the fields on the two-mile round walk to White Ladies Priory
  • Exploring Boscobel's history as a working farm and seeing the ducks and chickens
  • Visiting the education and family room where you can try on armour and dress as a Roundhead or Cavalier, get creative at the art table and try and guess the mystery object!
  • Victorian games in the garden including croquet, quoits, skittles and skipping ropes

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Prices and opening times

directions

Brewood, Bishop's Wood, Shropshire - ST19 9AR (Directions)

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