History of Baconsthorpe Castle

Baconsthorpe Castle is intimately linked to the dramatic rise and fall of the Heydon family, who lived there for 200 years. The Heydons first made their fortunes as lawyers, but the main source of their wealth came from the wool industry. Baconsthorpe Castle was built as their main residence in about 1450, and became larger and more elaborate as the family’s wealth grew. The accumulation of large debts, however, forced them to demolish much of the castle in 1650.

Aerial view of Baconsthorpe Castle, showing the remains of the outer gatehouse and inner castle

Aerial view of Baconsthorpe Castle, showing the remains of the outer gatehouse and inner castle

The Early Castle

The site of Baconsthorpe was acquired from the Bacon family in the early 15th century by William Baxter, a free yeoman.

The earliest castle building, the inner gatehouse, was begun by William’s son, John (d.1479), a lawyer who had risen to prominence as a supporter and agent of William de la Pole, 1st Duke of Suffolk. He changed the family name to Heydon to disguise his comparatively lowly origins. During the turbulent Wars of the Roses (1455–85), John often switched political allegiances to serve his own means.

John’s son, Sir Henry Heydon (d.1504), completed and extended the castle, adding the garden court in the early 16th century. He was knighted at Henry VII’s coronation in 1485 and held several highly responsible positions, which gave the family new status and stability, and allowed his successors to be peaceful and prosperous landlords.

An aerial view of the castle as it may have appeared in the mid-16th century, after the addition of the outer gatehouse

An aerial view of the castle as it may have appeared in the mid-16th century, after the addition of the outer gatehouse
© Historic England (illustration by Jill Atherton)

The Wool Industry at Baconsthorpe

Although the Heydons gained their initial wealth through the legal profession, it was the wool industry that eventually provided the bulk of their wealth. By the Tudor period, Baconsthorpe was established as a vast and profitable wool-producing estate.

Sir John Heydon II (c 1470–1550) converted the eastern service range of the castle into a wool processing ‘factory’. Large windows provided light for the spinners and weavers to produce cloth.

The textile industry brought considerable prosperity to the Heydon family, whose cloth was sold in both England and the Netherlands. Sir Christopher Heydon I (1518/19–79) once entertained 30 head shepherds of his own flocks at Christmas dinner, which suggests that there were 20,000 to 30,000 sheep on his lands.

Profits were spent on lavish living and extensive building works during the 16th century, including the construction of the outer gatehouse and a park in 1561.

        

FIND OUT MORE ABOUT THE HEYDONS’ WOOL FACTORY

The inner gatehouse (right) and moat, with the remains of the castle beyond

The inner gatehouse (right) and moat, with the remains of the castle beyond

The Fall of the Heydons

Despite the immense wealth they acquired from the wool industry, the Heydons were poor estate managers. Christopher Heydon I died in 1579 having accumulated large debts, forcing his son, William, to sell off parts of Baconsthorpe.

Yet the Heydons continued to spent large amounts on the castle: in the late 16th or early 17th century, an ornamental mere was created on the east arm of the moat, and the formal gardens which have been recorded on the estate were also probably created at this time.

By the mid-17th century the insolvency of successive Heydons forced them to demolish much of the castle to pay off their extensive debts. The outer gatehouse survived and was converted into a private dwelling, known as Baconsthorpe Hall. It remained occupied until 1920, when one of the turrets collapsed.


                       

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Further Reading

Dallas, C, Sherlock, D, Buckley, D and Glazebrook, J, Baconsthorpe Castle: Excavations and Finds 1951–1972, East Anglian Archaeology Report 102 (Dereham, 2002)

Rigold, SE, Baconsthorpe Castle, Norfolk (HMSO guidebook, London, 1966)

Rigold, SE, ‘Baconsthorpe Castle’, Archaeological Journal, 137 (1980), 331–2

Norwich Castle Museum holds many objects found during excavations at Baconsthorpe Castle.

 

Note

The text on this page is derived from interpretation panels at the site. We intend to update and enhance the content as soon as possible to provide more information on the property and its history.

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